Browsing All posts tagged under »Marin County«

With IBM’s acquisition of Emptoris the other shoe drops vis-à-vis the latter’s 2009 acquisition of Click Commerce or . . . will Jason Busch finally get what I was saying!

December 22, 2011

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Jon, I had a lot more respect for you before this post. Seriously, you seem to dismiss the market dynamics of acquisitions as not consequential, referencing indirectly what I wrote. But in doing so, you’re actually showing a complete lack of knowledge of what happens after software acquisitions and their impact on customers! comment by […]

With SaaS-Sprawl Fear Tactics Falling on Deaf Ears and Continuing Lawsuits 2010 is a Year most ERP Vendors Would Probably Like to Forget! Yet Few in the Industry Tell the Story?

November 14, 2010

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I have on many occasions wondered why over the years, there has been little if any coverage on the continuing (and still growing list of) failures on the part of ERP-centric initiatives to deliver results given the seemingly inexhaustible number of case references that have appeared in a variety of mediums including television news. Like […]

The M&A Shuffle or, Why Clients Assuming Responsibility for their Own Success is Forever Altering the Consultant/Vendor Landscape

October 22, 2010

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In yesterday’s post “eVA: Your Still The One!,”  I had provided a number of insights into why Virginia’s program continues to be one of the most enduring examples of a procurement initiative that has and continues to deliver results. While there are other programs to which I can refer in the context of being successful such […]

Spend Matters’ Recent Guest Author Post Underlines How The Industry Has Lost Its Objectivity through Familiarity

September 7, 2010

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Earlier today I posted an article titled “OECM Pulls (or Perhaps “Censors” is the right word) their SlideShare PowerPoint: Thank goodness for downloads!” in which I talk about how the relationship between vendors, purportedly independent industry analysts, and client-side senior management highlighted in “The Bands of Public Sector Supplier Engagement,” is far too “mafia-style” for everyone’s good. […]